John Diefendorf

Pension Application

State of New York
Montgomery County

I, Catharine Diefendorff of the Town of Minden in said County on the 14th day of October 1837, personally appeared before the Hon. David Savia, a judge of the Court of Common Pleas of said County of [illegible] in said court of said state, being a court of record, and being first duly sworn according to law doth on her oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the Act of Congress passed July 4th 1836. That she is a resident of said Court of Minden and aged ninety one years the 27 July 1837, and the widow of John Dievendorff late of said Town who was a soldier in the War of the Revolution and served repeatedly, but cannot state the particulars thereof.

She further states that she was married by the Rev. Mr. Rosencrantz, a clergyman to the said John Diefendorff on the 19th day of April 1768, as will appear by the paper hereto annexed marked (A.) giving to her late husband aforesaid by the Rev. Mr. Pick as she understood and believes from the record.

That her said husband the foresaid John Diefendorff died about three years ago in the summer the particular day she cannot state and that she has remained a widow ever since that period as will more fully appear by reference to the proof hereto annexed.

That her said husband was a pensioner at the time of his death, the reason of her bodily infirmity cannot attend court to make this declaration and does not write her name.
(her mark) Catharine Diefendorff

Sworn and subscribed on the day given above, written before me, D.G. Savia, Judge of the Court of Common Pleas of the County of Montgomery and [illegible] in Supreme Court of Said State.

John Diefendorf was born 10 day of May A.D. 1742. Catharine Hess was born 27 day of July A.D. 1746. John Diefendorff and Catharine Hess consecrated and entered into the solemn obligation of matrimony on the 19th day of April A. D. 1768.

Annex A
State of New York
County of Montgomery

On the 27th day of September in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-two, personally appeared before Henry I. Diefendorff Esquire, one of the Judges of the Court of Common Pleas of said county, John Diefendorff, a resident of the Town of Minden in the County and State foresaid, aged ninety years in May last, who being first duly sworn according to Law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June 7th 1832.  That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein after mentioned.

That in the month of February 1776, he was called upon and entered the service of his country in a company commanded by Capt. Henry Diefendorff, Sergeant Jacob Diefendorff and Ensign, George Countryman in Col. Ebenezer Cox’s Regiment. That the company to which he so belonged was then marched to Johnstown a distance of about eighteen miles, where the militia from different directions was collected.  That they were then stationed several days under Command of General Schuyler when they were discharged and he returned home.

That in the month of the following he was again called out in the company to which he so belonged, with the regiment under Col. Cox and marched under Command of General Herkimer to Cherry Valley, Otsego County, thence south to Unadilla when they were stationed about three weeks, until a compromise was made between General Herkimer and Col. Brandt who then commanded a part of Indians, troops and Tories, when they were discharged and they returned home.  The precise time of service in going to staying at  and returning from Johnstown aforesaid, and in going to staying at and returning from Unadilla aforesaid, he cannot state but that he did do he believes at least two month actual duty in the services of his country.

That in the month of June 1777 he was again called into the service of his country by his said officers above named and stationed with the company to which he belonged near the place when Fort Plank was afterwards built, was then kept on duty about eight days when they were relieved to return home for a short time, that he was called out at different times, put on duty and did one in scouting parties in different directions, until about the first of August following when he with the regiment to which he belonged marched to Oriskany in the County of Oneida, when he was on the sixth day of August engaged in the Oriskany Battle in which his said Capt. Diefendorff and Col. Cox were killed.

That about three days after the battle, they returned home when he was again kept on duty and out in scouting parties the most of the time until about the first of October following when they were marched to the town in Stillwater on their way to join in the battle against Burgoyne, that when they arrived near the place of battle they were informed that the battle was over or that they were not wanted and they returned home where he continued on duty and out in scouting parties as circumstances required until some time in the month of November following when his duties of the season ended, that he was the more of the time during that season in the service of his country and was required to be in constant readiness and that he did as he believed at least three months actual duty in that year in the service of his country.

That in the month of May 1778 he was again called into service by Capt. Jacob Diefendorff who succeeded Capt. Henry Diefendorff killed in the Oriskany Battle as above stated.  That he was stationed at Fort Plain then kept on duty and out in scouting parties in different locations as circumstances required to check the Indians and Tories that he was so kept on duty the most of the time until the month of November following when they were marched to Cherry Valley about twelve miles south of Fort Plain to protect the inhabitants from Tires and Savage cruelties, that they did not reach that place in time to save it from savage destruction but remained then a short time, buried the dead and then returned, that soon after he so entered hostilities of that season ended and he was dismissed and that during the season he did, as he believes at least four month actual duty in the service of his country.

That in the month of May 1779 he was again called into service by his said captain, was stationed at Fort Plank there kept on duty and out in scouting parties to protect the inhabitants and check the Indians and Tories, that he was so kept in service almost constantly, was occasionally allowed to go home for short periods but was required to be in constant readiness, that he so continued to serve until about the month of December following when hostilities of that season ended and that during that season he did, as he believes at least four months actual duty in the service of his country.

That about the first of May 1780 he was again called into service by the said Captain, was stationed at Fort Plain where kept on duty and out in scouting parties as circumstances required until about the last of July when he was in the company to which he belonged with other companies under the Command of Colonel Klock and General Van Rensselaer.

Marched to Fort Stanwix in the County of Oneida about fifty miles up the Mohawk River to guard the government boats and property to that place.  That they were in [illegible] about eight days in that service.

That after they returned he was again stationed at Fort Plain there kept on duty and out in parties as circumstances required until about the twelfth day of October following when they were marched against the enemy commanded by Sir John Johnston who was burning and destroying up the north side of the Mohawk River, that they marched across the river under command of Col. Clyde the successor of Col. Cox.  That on the north side of the river they joined a body of troops under command of Col. DuBois and a body of men under Gen. VanRensselaer. They pursued the enemy up the river towards the East Canada Creek, overtook them, commended an engagement near dusk, fought some time when the enemy retreated.  That night crossed the river and marched westward.  That the next morning they pursued them several miles but finding that they were out of reach, they returned.  That after they so returned he was again stationed at Fort Plain.  They kept on duty and out in parties as circumstances required, and some time in December following when he was again allowed to go home, and that in the various duties done by him during that season he did as he believes at least three months actual duty in the service of his country.

That about the first of May 1787 he was again called into service by his said captain, was stationed at Fort Plain, there kept on duty and out in parties as circumstances required, the greatest part of the time until in October following was left to guard the fort when Col. Willett marched to Johnstown with other and fought the battle with Butler and Ross and that when Col. Willett with his men were marching up the Mohawk River he joined them and pursued Butler and his party to the West Canada Creek were they were overtaken when Butler and several of his part were killed and then they returned home.  And that he did during that season as he believes at least three months actual duty in the service of his country.

Her hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state.
(His Mark) John Diefendorff

Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid before me, Henry I. Diefendorff a Judge of Montgomery County Court of Pleas