Abraham Wolleber (1756 - 1819)

Widow's Pension Application by Dorothy (Bellinger) Wolleber

State of New York
Courtland County

On the 14th day of August 1837, personally appeared before me, William Bartlett, a Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, in and for said County of Courtland, Dorothy Wolleber, a resident of the Town of Truxton in said County of Courtland and State of New York, aged eighty two years, who being first duly sworn, according to law, doth on her oath make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by Act of Congress passed July 4, 1836.

That she is the widow of Abraham Wolleber, a soldier of the revolution and who did duty in the Revolutionary War as a private in the company of militia commanded by Capt. Michael Ittig in the Regiment of Militia commanded by Col. Peter Bellinger in the now County of Herkimer and that he was at different times in the service of his country as a private in said company.

That he was a private in a company of drafted militia commanded by a captain whomever, she the said Dorothy does not recollect which said company was drafted for services at Fort Stanwix and even marched to that place sometime in the year 1779. And that he the said Abraham Wolleber returned home from the said service after and absence of two months and twenty seven days, and further that in the year 1780 according to her best recollection her said husband performed garrison duty in Fort Dayton Herkimer County for the term of fourteen days and that in the year following her husband was performing duty as a private in the company under the command of the said Capt. Ittig in Fort Herkimer in said Herkimer County during an incursion of the enemy during which time he was sent out to procure fire wood for the garrison and was while out on this duty wounded and scalped by the enemy by means of which he was confined to his bed and home six months before he was enabled to attend to his ordinary affairs and for which said serving and in consideration of his wounds and sufferings he was allowed a pension by Congress which he received up to the time of his death.

She further declares that she was married to the said Abraham Wolleber on the 25th day of January 1778 by the Rev. Abraham Rosencrantz in the Town of German Flatts and now County of Herkimer when her said husband did reside after which they removed into the now Town of Whembre in said County where they continued to reside to the time of the death of her said husband which took place on the 6 day of February 1819 after which she has been a resident of the Town and County of Courtland where she now resides. She further declares that she has remained a widow ever since that period, which will more fully appear by the proof hereto annexed.

(Signed with her mark) Dorothy Wolleber.

State of New York
Herkimer County
On this twelfth day of April one thousand eight hundred and forty three before the under named Justice of the Peace in and for said county personally appeared, Elizabeth Shoemaker of German Flatts aged seventy seven years the first day of April instant who being first duly sworn according to law doth on her oath say that in the Revolutionary War she was well acquainted with Abraham Wolever deceased, who was her uncle. That she well remembers that the said Abraham was in the service of the United States in the militia in the Revolutionary War in the company commanded a portion of the time by Captain Frederick Frank at and about Fort Herkimer. That she frequently saw the said Abraham go out on excursions with the company and portions of the company, but she cannot now particularly recollect the years nor the particulars of the service now how long he was gone at any one time.

That she this deponent then was gone at any one time and recollects particularly that she often saw him go out on tours of service and return to the fort with other soldiers and she also recollects that she often saw him on duty as guard.

That Michael Ittig commanded the company a portion of the time, that at the time the Oriskany Battle was said, Ittig was captain but Ittig did not go with the company. The company went and the said Abraham Wolever and his brothers, John and Dederick Wolever who were also uncles of this deponent also went. That after the battle the said Abraham again returned, but his brothers John and Dederick were both slain and were recognized by their friends who went after the battle to bury the dead slain in that battle.

That the said Abraham continued in the service afterwards, but the year she cannot remember, he was taken prisoner by the enemy about a mile east of the fort and was supposed to have been carried to Canada or killed but the third day he was accidentally found by a party of men sent by Capt. McGregor, Lieut. Mason and Ensign Doty who were officers at said fort, about two miles south from the fort after horses that were kept there. That when he was found he was scalped and nearly lifeless. That he was brought to the fort and was confined nearly two years by the injury received before he recovered so as to be able to do much of any thing.

That he was taken and scalped in the fall of the year, the weather was cold and his feet were frozen and at an expiration of about two years when he recovered he again went into the service. She recollects that she saw him go out on excursions with parties of soldiers after this recovery buy she cannot particularize.

The said Abraham Wolever was married before the commencement or about the commencement of the war to Dorothy Bellinger. That he has been dead about twenty five years leaving the said Dorothy his widow who is still surviving, remaining his widow. That the said Abraham and Dorothy had no children born until after they had been married seven years.

That she always understood that the said Abraham received a pension in his life time.

That to the best of her recollection he was at least two years confined before he entirely recovered from his wounds so as to be able to do anything. That while he was under the charge of the surgeon he was one time taken to Fort Plain and was there kept about one month or more and was then brought back to Fort Herkimer and places under the care of Doctor Petrie.

(Signed with her mark) Elizabeth Shoemaker

State of New York
Otsego County
Elisabeth Keslar of the Town of Little Falls in the County of Herkimer and State of New York being duly sworn according to law, on her oath deponeth and saith that she is the widow of Jacob Keslar late of said County of Herkimer deceased is aged eighty one years and upwards and that her maiden name was Elisabeth Miller.

That she perfectly recollects being present at the marriage of Abraham Woleben to Dorothy Bellinger. That it took place sometime during the Revolutionary War and that it took place in the winter season of the year and was after the Oriskany Battle but what particular year or month this deponent does not recollect.

This deponent further saith that said marriage service was performed by Abraham Rosencrantz a clergyman of the Reformed Dutch Church and that it took place at their dwelling house of said clergyman situate near old Fort Herkimer on the Mohawk River.

This deponent further saith that she perfectly recollects that said Abraham Woleben was scalped by the Indians after his marriage but how long after deponent does not recollect and further saith not.

(Signed) Elizabeth Keslar

State of New York
Otego County
On this 25th day of December 1838, personally appeared before the subscriber, first judge of Otego County Courts, Dorothy Woleben of the Town of Richfield in the County of Otsego aged eighty three years and upwards, who being first duly sworn according to law doth on her oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provisions made by the act of Congress passed July 7th 1838 entitled an act granting half pay and pensions to certain widows.

That she is the widow of Abraham Woleben who was a private soldier in Captain Michael Eddick’s Company in Col. Herkimer’s Regiment of the New York Militia.

She does not recollect the length of times her said husband was in the service nor the particular services rendered. He was taken by the Indians and scalped and left by them for dead. He survived and shortly or not many years after the close of the revolution a pension was granted him by the government of the United States which he received up to the time of his death for the evidence of the particular services rendered, she begs leave to refer to the evidence on file when her said husband was placed on the pension roll.

She further declares that she was married to the said Abraham Woleben by Abraham Rosecrants a clergyman of the Reformed Dutch Church (who is now deceased) on the twenty fifth day of January one thousand seven hundred and seventy eight.

That she knows of only one person now living who was present at the marriage above mentioned and that person is one Elisabeth Miller who is now the widow Keslar that said widow Keslar now resides on the Mohawk River in the Town of German Flatts or near there.

That her said husband, the aforesaid Abraham Woleben died on the sixth day of February one thousand eight hundred and nineteen.

That her husband did service previous to the marriage and was at the Oriskany Battle which was previous and what other services she cannot now recollect. She believes he did some services after the marriage but cannot speak with much degree of certainly concerning it.

That the marriage took place previous to the first day of January seventeen hundred and ninety four viz at the time above stated.
(Signed with her mark) Dorothy Woleben

State of New York
Herkimer County
On this 22nd day of April 1848 before me the under named Justice of the Peace in and for said county personally came Nicholas Wollaber of the Town of Herkimer in said county aged seventy four years in August next as near as he can now ascertain his age (the record thereof being lost) who being first duly sworn according to law does on his oath say that in the Revolutionary War he with his father’s family lived at Fort Herkimer on the Mohawk River in said state.

That Abraham Wolever whose name is sometimes spelled Wollaber was an uncle of this deponent and this deponet was then well acquainted with the said Abraham. That the said Abraham was in the service of the United State in the said war. That as this deponent was always informed and believed true and ever believes true, and such was the current understanding in the neighborhood that the said Abraham with his three brothers were engaged in the Oriskany Battle. That the said Abraham and Peter Wolever, the father of this deponent again returned home after the battle and John and Dederick his two other brothers, were killed in that battle. That afterwards and this deponent thinks it was in the year 1781, in the fall of the year the said Abraham was taken prisoner near the said fort and was taken as was afterwards ascertained about two or three miles length south of said fort on what was then and is now called shoemaker hill where he was found on the third day after by a party of men sent out by Captain McGreger who then commanded at the fort. That when found he had been scalped and was almost exhausted in which condition he was brought to the fort. He had his wounds dressed and the next morning this deponent saw him, the weather was cold and the feet of the said Abraham were frozen so that the flesh came off. That Doctor Petrie was the surgeon at the fort. That the said Abraham remained confined under the care of the surgeon of the fort in consequence of his said wounds until the following spring when he was carried on a little to the Mohawk River and placed in a canoe and came to Fort Plain to be places under the care of the surgeon at the place that this deponent accompanied him from Fort Herkimer to the Mohawk River being a short distance only.

This deponent cannot now recollect how long he remained at Fort Plain before he again was brought back to Fort Herkimer or how long he remained confined of his wounds, but it was a year or more that after he again recovered so as to be out and thinks it was in the month of July after a cessation of arms there was an attack upon the said fort by about seven hundred as was said of the enemy composed of Indians and Tories. And a severe engagement ensued between Captain McGregor’s Company and the militia with the enemy.

That this deponent was engaged in the said engagement and the said Abraham also took part therein although not well.

That this deponent was informed by Frederick Bellinger who was also a Revolutionary Soldier and is now dead. That the said Abraham was also engaged in the boat service and which service the said Bellinger was also engaged.

That the said Abraham was married before about the commencement of the said war. This deponent recollects he was married as early as 1776 to Dorothy Bellinger, daughter of Peter Bellinger. That eh said Abraham died about twenty-four years ago leaving the said Dorothy, his widow who still survives him and is his widow.

(Signed) Nicholas Wolber
April 22, 1843

I certify that I have been acquainted with Nicholas Wolleber the above deponent for twenty-five years and that he is a farmer of good standing and his statements entitled to full credit that he is a man of good moral character.
J. A. Rasbach, Justice